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Full text of "Foreign crops and markets"

Historic, archived document 



Do not assume content reflects current 
scientific knowledge, policies, or practices. 



FOREIGN CROPS AND MARKETS 



ISSUED WEEKLY BY 
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
WASHINGTON. O. C 

Vol. 34 May 17, 1937 No. 20 



LATE CABLES... 

Japan total wheat imports July to March 
1936-37 amounted to 6,429,000 bushels compared 
with 11,270,000 bushels for same period last 
year. (Shanghai office, Bureau of Agricultural 
Economics . ) 

China raw cotton imports October to March 
1936-37 totaled 47,484 bales of 500 pounds each, 
while exports for the same period were 163,882 
bales. (Shanghai office, Bureau of Agricultural 
Economics . ) 



264 Foreign Crops and Markets. Vol. 34, No. 20 



GRAINS 

Canadian grain acreage smaller for 193 7 

A decrease in the 1937 Canadian grain acreage of half a million 
acres is to be expected if the intentions of farmers on May 1 are carried 
out, according to the Dominion Bureau of Statistics at Ottawa. The in- 
tended area of spring wheat is reported at 24,367,800 acres as compared 
with 24,779,700 acres sown in 1936 and 26,646,000 acres in the peak year 
1932. Increases are indicated in Manitoba, Quebec, and New Brunswick, 
while the greatest decrease is expected in Saskatchewan. The intended 
area of durum wheat amounts to about 1,708,000 acres, or an increase of 
80,500 acres over the durum acreage of 1936. The area of fall wheat re- 
maining for harvest, which is all in the Province of Ontario, is estimated 
at 646,000 acres as compared with 509,300 acres harvested last year. The 
acreage winter-killed was placed at 8 percent, which is the same as in 
the winter of 1935-36, but the condition of the winter crop on April 30 
was better than on the corresponding date of 1936. 

A slight increase is indicated in the area intended for spring 
rye, which is relatively unimportant , but the abandonment of the winter 
area amounted to 9 percent, leaving only 413,000 acres for harvest as 
against 457,300 acres harvested last year. 

The spring has been generally backward throughout Canada, except 
in the Provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan, where farm operations have 
been more advanced than in 1936. Lack of moisture is rather serious in 
the Prairie Provinces, particularly in southern Alberta and parts of 
Saskatchewan. Soil drifting in these sections is already menacing crop 
prospects. Pine warm weather in early May aided Canadian farm work, how- 
ever, and seeding operations on the prairies are now general, with prepa- 
rations for the new crops in northern districts well ahead of the same 
date last year . 

Winter-grain crop of central Europe deteriorates 



The grain crops of central Europe suffered considerably during 
the past winter, according to reports received in the Bureau of Agricul- 
tural Economics. In Germany, the wheat acreage winter-killed was esti- 
mated at 6.9 percent of the area sown, which is the largest winter loss 
experienced since 1922, and compares with the 10-year average of 2.7 per- 
cent. The area of winter rye lost amounted to 4.2 percent, the largest 
loss reported during the past 6 years. Abandonment of the winter-barley 
acreage was 6.5 percent as against 0.1 percent last year. 

Condition figures as of May 1 indicate poorer prospects for all 
three winter grains in Germany than was reported on the corresponding 
date of 1936. Condition figures for both Poland and Czechoslovakia also 
are well below those of last season. In Poland, recent legislation 



May 17, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



265 



prohibiting exports of cereals was largely influenced by the deteriora- 
tion of the wint er-whe at and rye crops, which was> attributed to the 
lack of snow cover during the severe frosts of January and February. 

FRUITS, VEGETABLES,., MD NUTS 
Early indications point to large fruit crops in Europe 



European fru.it prospects at the present time appear favorable, 
according to a cable from C- C Taylor, Agricultural Attache at London. 
No serious frost damage has been reported and the condition of the trees 
is generally good. Setting prospects are excellent in England since 
blossoming was generally profuse. The harvest may be smaller this sea- 
son than the large crop of 1936, however. The season is about 2 weeks 
late in the central European countries but trees are blossoming well. 
Some damage may have been done by the excessive rains during the pollina- 
tion period. 

Prospects are for much better fruit crops than last year, par- 
ticularly apples and pears, in Holland, Switzerland, Austria, and Germany. 
Apple and pear trees carried a good bloom in France but it was not as 
profuse as last year. Pear prospects are very good in the Phone and 
Garonne sections and peach trees are heavily loaded. Present indications 
point to fairly good fruit crops in Italy. Blossoming has just begun 
in the Scandinavian countries. Blossoming was good in Bulgaria but the 
prune crop was adversely affected by excessive rains. Apples probably will 
be a good crop in Hungary but apricots, plums, pears, and walnuts were 
injured by frost and rain. Apples, pears, prunes, and walnuts made a good 
set in Rumania but apricots, berries, and plums were damaged by frost. 
Prospects are favorable for all fruits in Yugoslavia except late prunes, 
which were seriously damaged by variable weather conditions and by the 
prune wasp . 

LIVESTOCK, MEATS, AND WOOL 

British fresh pork quot a ext ende d. 

The British quotas covering imports of fresh pork from non-Empire 
countries for the %hXt& quarter of 1937 were recently extended on the 
same basis as that employed in the 2 previous years. The allocation to 
the United States amounts, therefore, to 2,834,608 pounds, of which the 
usual 257,600 pounds may be imported, for curing in the United Kingdom. 

In 1934 the United States supplied more than 32,500,000 pounds of 
fresh pork to the United Kingdom, or 26 percent of the total imported. 
Because of restricted supplies, increased domestic demand, and high prices 
in the United States, the United States quota has not been utilized since 
the first half of 1935; only about 1,000,000 pounds of the 4,600,000-pound 
quota were shipped during the first quarter of the current year. See 
table on page 270. 



265 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, No. 20 



INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN COTTON, AUGUST-MARCH , 1936-37 

The volume, of. cotton entering, into world trade during the 8 
months ended March .31 , 1937 , stood at 9,265,000 hales. This exceeded 
world exports for the same period of the 2 preceding years "but did not 
equal the 10-year average when, world exports stood at 9,750,000 hales. 
The United States is supplying a relatively smaller share of this total 
while British India, Egypt , and South American countries are supplying 
a larger share. Formerly at least two- thirds of all world exports came 
from the United States, hut in the August-March period of 1936-37 ahout 
50 percent was United States cotton. 

In the decade from 1923-2*4 to 1932-33, British India supplied 19. 
percent as against 25 percent so far this season, Egypt 11 percent in 
compari son .with 16 percent in 1935-37, while the comhined exports from 
Brazil, Peru, and Argentina rose from less than 2 percent to 9 percent 
of the world total. 

Principal exporting countri es 

U nited States : During the 8 months ended March 31, the United '. : 
States exported 4,596,000 hales. A comparison of these figures with 
the 10-year average of 6,601,000 bales and 5,058,000 hales last season 
show a downward trend and represent decreases of 30 percent and 9 per- 
cent, respectively. More than one-fourth or 1,295,000 hales went to 
Japan. British markets absorbed 1,002,000 bales and Germany 525,000 
bales, experts to the last two being less than a year ago. In addition 
to Japan the only countries showing gains over last season were France, 
the Netherlands, Sweden, and Canada. Exports to Canada, which reached 
215,000 bales, continue their slow but continuous advance. 

Egypt: Exports from Egypt made noticeable progress, reaching 
1,440,000 bales in the 8 months ended March 31, 1937. This compared 
with the 10-year average of 1,087,000 bales exported during the same 8 
months of 1323-24 to 1932-33, a gain of 32 percent, and 1,282,000 bales 
in 1335-36, an increase of 12 percent. The United Kingdom is credited 
with receiving 504,000 bales, the largest for any like period. Japan 
absorbed 134,000 bales, a peak figure which was more than double the 
volume sent to Japan in the same 8 months of 1935-36. Poland, Italy, 
Germany, Spain, and France are taking less Egyptian cotton than a year 
ago. 

British India : In 1936-37, British India increased exports to a 
total of 2,328,000 bales, an all-time peak for the 8 months' period. 
For the same 8 months of last season the exports stood at 1,850,000 bales, 
which was only, slightly larger than the average exports from 1923-24. to 
1932-33. Slightly more than 1,334,000 bales went to Japan, an all-time 
record for that period. A little more than 309,000 bales went to British 
markets, or nearly 3 times the 10-year average. 



May 17, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



267 



I NTEBNAT 1 01LAL TRADE IN COTTON , AUGUST-MARCH, 1936-37, CONT'D 

Brazi l : Exports from Brazil exceeded those of any other like pe- 
riod, the total standing at 579,000 Dales. This compares with the 10-year 
average of 75,000 "bales and with exports a year ago .of 367,000 bales, 
representing a gain of 58 percent over last season. In the corresponding 
period of 1934-35 Brazil exported 523,000 bales, the highest up to that 
time. 

Argentina and Peru: Argentine exports of raw cotton so far this 
season have totaled 124,000 bales or three times the 10-year average. 
So far this season Peru has exported 189,000 bales which rank second 
only to those of a year earlier when the total exports stood at 217,000 
bales . 

COTTON: Summary of world exports, average 1923-24 to 1932-33 
and 1934-35 to 1935-37 



August-March 

\_ Quantit y 

Exporting I Average . 

countries j 1923-24 j 1933 _ 34 \ 193 4_ 35 ■ 1935-35. ;.. 1936-37 

to : : : : 

: : 1952-53 ; ; : - ■ - ■ 

j 1,000 j 1,000 j 1,000 i 1,060"; 1,000 

; bales j b ale s ! bales ; bales : bales 

United States \ 6,601 \ 6,454 j 3,747 j 5, 058' 4,596. 

British India j 1,816 \ 1,481 : 1,630 : 1, 850' ' • ' ' 2, 328 

Egypt : I 1,087 ! 1,404 : 1,237 ■ 1,282 ; 1,440 

Brazil ! 75 : 123 : 528 ; 367 j l/ 579 

Peru j 130 : ' 149 ■ 180 j 224 : 198 

Argentina j 41 j 36 \ 69 j IIP j ; ; ; '124 

Total " | 9,750 \ 9,647 ! 7,391 i 8, 891 ' • ' ' 9, 265 



". Per c entage of total • • ' 

: percent P ercent . percent : Percent . Percent 

United States j 68. i- . 67 j 51 | 57 \ 50 

British India j 19 j 15 j 22 j '21' \ 25 

Egypt i 11 < 15.3 I? I "15- ' j 16 

Brazil : 1 \ 1 ■ 7; 4"i 6 

Peru j 1 : 2 2 j • • 2 - • \ ■ 2 

Argentina , j 2_/ _: 2_/ ; _1 _ 1_ j 1_ 

Total : . 100 : 100 ; 100 ; 100 : 100 



Compiled from official sources. 

l/ Statistics for March are estimated. 

2/ Less than .5 percent. 



268 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol, 34, No. 20 



INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN COTTON, 1936-37, CONT'D 

COTTON: Destination of exports, from the principal exporting countries, 
August-March, average 1923-24 .to. 1932-33, and 1934-35 to 1936-37 a/ 



Destination 
of exports 
from principal 
exporting 
countries 



August-March 



Quant ity 



Average 
1923-24 

to 
1932-53 



1934-35* 



1935-3S 1936-37 



Percentage of total 



Ave rage 
1923-24 

to 
1932-33 



1934-35 



1935-36 



E xports from the 
United States to 
Germany. . . . . 
United Kingdom 
France. . .V. 

Italy 

Spain 

Belgium . . . 
Netherlands 
U. S. S.R. 

(Russia) d/ 

Sweden 

Portugal ..... 
Poland & Danzi 
Other Europe. . 

Total Europe 

Canada 

Japan 

China 

British India. 
Other countries 

Total , . 

British India to 

Japan 

Italy 

China . 

Germany ....... 

Belgium 

United Kingdom 

France 

Spain 

Netherlands. . . . 
Other countries 

Total 



1,000 
"bales 



1,000 
hales 



1,000 
"bales 



1,000 
bales 



■Percent 



Percent 



Percent 



1,538 


267 


663 


525 


23 


7 


13 


11 


1,504 


582 


1, 129 


1,002 


23 


16 


22 


■-22 ■ 


747 


313 


619 


651 


11 


8 


12 .. 


14 


545 


390 


301 


286 


8 


10 


6 


6 


240 


197 


183 


jb/ 


4 


5 


4 


/ 

£J 


156 


63 


150 


141 


2 


2 


3 


3 


116 


46 


. 60 


77 


2 


1 


1 


2 


88 


0 


0 


1 


1 


0 


0 


c/ 


49 


68 


67 


72 


1 


2 


1 


2 


34- 


29 


47 


30 


. 1 


1 


1 


1 


15 


152 


215 


151 


c/ 


4 


4 


3 


49 


69 


79 


90 


1 


2 


2 


2 


5.081 


2 . 176 


3.513 


3.026 


77 


58 


69 


66 


155 


152 


197 


215 


2 


4 


4 


5 


1,065 ; 


1,256'i 


1,274 


1,295 


■ 16 


■ 34 - 


.25 


28 


224. 


95 : 


34 


13 


3 


3 • 


1 


sJ 


63 


39 : 


7 


8 


1 


1 


c/ 


sJ 


13 : 


:i9 Lj 


33 


39 


1 


c/ 


1 


1 


6,601 


3,747 ! 


5,058 


4 t 596 


100 


100 


100 


100 


900 


878 : 


954 


1 , 334. 


50 


• 54:. • 


52 


57 


201 


173 


66 


124 


11 


11 


4 


5 


178 


37 : 


38 


8 


10 


2 


2 


c/ 


123 


76 • 


161 , 


96 


7 


5 


9 


4 


121 


90 : 


129 ' 


200 


7 


5 


7 


9 


111 


174 ; 


252 


309 


6 


11 


14. 


13 


88 


85 


95 


83 


5 


. 5 


5 


4 


37 


36 


38 


b/e/ 


2 


2 


2 


oJ 


24 


25 


26 


e/ 18 


1 


■■2 : 


1 


1 


33 


56 


,91 


156 


1 


3 


4 


7 


1,816 


1.630 


1,850 


2.328 


100 


100 


100 


100 



May 17, 1937 



269 



INTENTIONAL TRADE IN COTTON, 1936-37, CONT'D 



COTTON: Destination of exports from the principal exporting countries, 
August-March, average 1923-24 to 1932-33, end 1934-35 to 1936-37, cont'd 





August -March 


.UC o J. roller, u X U il 

of exports 




— Quan 


tils 




Per 


centage 


of total 




Average 








Average 








from principal 
exporting 


1923-24 
to 


iy^4-3b 


1935-36 


1936-37 


1923-24 
to 




iy (3D— OD 




countries 


1932-33 








1932-33 










1, 000 


1,000 


1,000 


ly.000 












hales , 


hales 


bales 


hales 


percent 


Percent ' 


Percent 


Percent 


jiiJL p u r o s I r o m 


















ili pi Ti 0 


















T Tv> 1 fori Tc r n y-i rrr^ r\ m 
Uii-LOcU. AJ.IlgU.Ulu-. 


432 


339 


442 


504 . 


40 


27 


34 


35 




140 


135 


179 


159 


13 


11 


14 


.11 


United States . . . 


127 


42 


43 


54 


12 


3 


3 


4 


Germany 


76 


88 


117 


105 


7 


7 


o 


7 




72 

ou 

A Q 


122 

142 
a a 


74 
81 

/I r ") 

rl 


72 
194 

60 


7 

rr 

D 

A 

4 


10 
11 


6 


5 




6 


4 




4 


O 


St) Pin 


3b 


72 


0 


6 


b 


b 


u 


TT £ S P 












\HU.obld,j 


34 




f/ 


f/ 


3 








Czechoslovakia. . 


22 


37 


' 50 


54 


2 


3 


4 


: 4 


British India. . . 


1 7 


89 


49 


70 


2 


r 


4 


! t> 


JT u -i-ci-ilU. Cx i^d-Xl z, 


Q 


27 


do 


24 


l 


2 


2 


! o 

; <d 


0 "b Vi pv r» nn *n "h t* T p q 


25* 


95 


108 


144 


1 


9 


: 9 


: 1° 


Tota] 


1 OR 7 


1 P r ^7 

J- , Ou f 


J- , CyOO 


1 4.4.0 


1 00 


1 00 


100 


100 










August - 


February 








Brazil to 


















United Kingdom 




210 


85 


189 




43 


26 


i 34 






138 

: b/ 


166 
6 


169 
66 
30 

: 26 

; 16 




29 
c/ 
3 


50 
2 


31 








12 
5 






: 16 
: 45 
; 33 


6 




2 






24 
20 




10 


7 

6 


5 


Belgium- Luxe hi. 






7 


3 


Netherlands «... 




: 20 


15 


i 15 




4 


4 


3 






: 21 
: 2 


7 
3 


: 14 

: 11 

: 13 




4 


2 
1 


2 








c/ 
c/ 


2 


Other countries. 








c/ 


3 


Total. 




485 


332 


: 549 


i 100 


100 


100 


100 



Compiled from official sources. 

a/ Bales of 478 pounds net, except for the United States which are in hales of 
500 pounds gross, h/ Less than 500 hales. c/ Less than 0.5 percent. d/ Be- 
ginning January 1, 1935, includes Eussia in Asia, e/ Six months, August -January. 
tj If any, included in "Other countries." g_/ No data available by countries. 



270 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, Ho. 20 



UNITED KINGDOM: Fresh pork imports and quota allocations 
to the United States, 1934-1937 



I Quot a allocations to the United States 



period 



_D X Urn U-tl-L ucU. 


Total 


Period 


Total 




1 000 "nnnnrl 






1 000 "nOiiTif^ ^ 


1 000 n ouiids 






1936 - 






32,521 


123,807 


1st quarter 


4,584 


258^^ 


3,633 


102,491 


2d quart er 


2,845 


257 


1,202 


114,824 


3d quarter 


2,835 


258 






4th quarter 


4,916 


257 






Total. . . . 


15,180 


1,030 


10,796 


33,537 


1937 - 






4,806 


27,423 


1st quarter 


4,584 


258 


330 


29 , 010 


2d quarter 


2,845 


257 


1,047 


31,055 


3d quarter 


2, 835 


258 



1934, 
1935, 
1936, 



1st quarter 

1934 

1935 

1936 

1937 



Trade and Navigation of the United Kingdom and official sources. 



HOGS AND POPK PRODUCTS 



Foreign and domestic average prices per 100 pounds, 
March 1937, with comparisons 



Item 



1909-1913 
average 



1925-1929 
average 



Mar. 1936 'Feb. 1937 



Mar. 1936 



Hogs, Chicago, basis 
packers 1 and shippers' 
quotations 

Corn , Chicago, No. 3 yellow 

Hogs , heavy, Berlin, live 
weight 

Barley , Leipzig 

Lard - 

Chicago 

Liverpool 

Hamburg 

Cured por k - 
Liverpool - 

American short cut green 
hams 

American green bellies.. 

Danish Wiltshire sides.. 

Canadian green sides.... 



Dollars 



Dollars 



Dollars 



Dollars 



Dollars 



8.02 


11 . 31 


10.24 


10.08 


10.11 


1.04 


; 1.61 


1.09 


1.98 


2.07 


11 . 35 


; 14.03 


17.70 


15.79 


16.79 


1.75 


; 2.37 


3.31 


3.27 


3.30 


10.60 


: 14.83 


11.88 


13.30 


13.15 


11.80 


■ 15.32 


13.00 


14.40 


14.79 


13.89 


• 15.72 


. 12.53 


14.22 


14.18 


13.80 


22.72 


19.65 


20.51 


20.63 




! 20 . 24 


Nominal 


17.60 


16.87 


14.70 


23.20 


20.56 


18.79 


19.50 


14.14 


1/22.20 


17.87 


16.39 


17.34 



l/ Three-year average only 



May 17, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



271 



■HOGS AND POEK PRODUCTS: Indie 
October-March, 



es of foreign supplies and demand, 
1933-34 to 193 6-37 







Oc t oho r-Mar ch 


C ount ry | 




1909-10 : 


1924-25 










and 


Uni t 


to : 


to ! 


1933-34; 


1934-35: 


1935-36J 


1936-37 


item 




1913-14 • 
ave ra^e ; 


1928-29 
average 










UNITED KINGDOM; ' 
















Supplies, domestic : 


1,000 ' 














fresh pork, London; 


pounds! 




35,279 ' 


42,201 


45,577 


50,205 


46,927 


Imports - • 
















Bacon - ' 


















ii 


120,293 


250,889 
30 , 160 


244,210 
17,065 


216,303 
24,422 


195,539 
27,428 


182,824 
28,827 


Irish Free State. 


ti 


United States . . . . 


I! 


: 95, 790 j 


57,716 


2,792 


1,757 


9 65 


850 




ii 


19 ,889'" 
20, 376 


39,767 

75,024 


47 , 037 
132 , 820 


55 , 727 
96,090 


49,394 


82,966 




ii 


89,706 


86,715 




ii 


256,348 


453,556 


443,926 


394,298 


363,031 


383,182 


Lard, total 


ii 


115,615 


132 , 506 


160,051 


119,176 


79,569 


80,445 




it 


44,415 


60,079, 


37,343 


33, 115 


32,572 


34,078 


CANADA: 




Slaughter - 
















Hogs, inspected 


1 , 000 s 


874- 


1,461 


1,557 


1,562 


' 1,572 


2,257 


GEBMANY : 
















Production - 
















Hog receipts 
14 cities 


t! 




1,636 


1, 641 


.1,740 


i 1,107 


1,937 


Hog slaughter 


















fl 


2 , 237 


2,038 


2,224 


2,331 


j 1,479 


2, 523 


Imports - 


1, 000 
















pounds 
ii 


1,475 
105,362 


•" 10,106 
113,311 


16,786 
74,430 


15,031 
32., 267 


; 13,937 
| 52,613 


10,421 
30 , 460 




UNITED STATES: 




Slaughter - 
















Hogs, inspected... 


■1,000s 


17,416 


25,967 




19,379 


• 15,796 


21,866 


Exports 
















Bacon 


: i , ooo 














United Kingdom. . . 


! pounds 


I 68,346 


; 35,407 


1,319 


1,042 


372 


427 




! ii 


■ 1,045 
! 3,801 


• 6,099 
: 10,869 


; .2,390 
I 2,226 


: 0 


' 0 


: o 




i ii 


! 2 , 48 5 


; 494 


: 451 


Total 


1 ii 


I 92,954 


; 75,371 


: 12,977 


I 4,684 


: 1,328 


1,574 


Hams, shoulders- 
United Kingdom. . . 


1 " 


: 68 , 594 


! 70,441 


■ 26,239 


; 21,537 


j 16,510 


13, 083 


* ii 


■ 79,265 


: ■ 85,024 


: 30,866 


' 26,855 


i 19,440 


15,818- 


Lard - - 
















United Kingdom. . . 


; it 


j 89,430 


1 114,898 


• 155,566 


79,445 


i 32,509 


26,153 




• ii 


: 76,146 
i 18,216 
; 21,218 


■ 99 , 125 

j 41,883 
i 23 , 674 


; 45,602 
■ 6,626 
: 16,250 


' 2,513 
16,631 
: 9 


• 3,031 


1,036 




'. it 


| 10,310 


15,936 




', ii 


: 39 


c 




ii 


: 250,009 


: 379,652 


279, 756 


106,971 


: 47,608 


40,985 



272 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 34, No. 20 



WHEAT AND RYE: Winter acreage in specified countries, 1934-1937 



; : ; Country :• - 


: - 1934 


1935 


1936 




1937 ' 




, ; 1, 000 acres 


1JD00 acres 


1,000 acres 


1 1,000 acres . 


': "" WHEAJT 


. r 






a/ 








33,402 


37, 608 


47,410 


Winter.- 

ucuiaua. spring 


.■ : 425 
. : 23 , 559 


555 
23, 561 


-. 509. 
24, 780 




646 
24,368 


T?l / 




13,007 


12, 536 




12,772 ' 


T 4- "1 ,,. 


. ; 12,030 


12, 142 


12,424 


±1 


12, 647 




. ; 4, '668 


4,735 


4,725 ■ 


4,263 




. ; 3 , 774 


3, 756 


3, 734 




3,647 


England and Wales. . . 


. ; 1,759 


1,772 


1, 703 




1,754 






2,092 


2,012 




■ 2,076 






2,250 


2, 206 




1,969 






380 


420 




431 






414 


349 




388 






210 


146 




154 






3,010 


2,595 




2,845 




. ; 3,890 


4, 154 


4,045 




3,706 




. ; 6,824 


hi r*i a r\ 

7 , /4U 


( , 7 




7,413 






rr r? fry 

b , 367 


O, 456 




5,436 






4 , 09 5 


A 'inn 

4, 28 ( 




4,191 




» 7C AT n 


33 ,9 55 


rjrj r C-C\ 

6o , bbu 




33,359 


■ rn ^ 4- ~ ~i 


| 1 


1 c c coo 

loo , by r 


ibu , yio 


169 , 475 










a 






. : 2,035 


4,141 


2,757 


4,092 


Canada: 


. ! 537 
. j 148 


574 
146 


457 
178 


a/ 

U/ 


413 
182 






11,052 


10,970 


e/ 


9,966 






14., 229 


14,339 




14 , 247' 






: 2 ! ,'464 


2,465 ■ 




2,447 






: 1,258 


1,206 




1,269 






658 


637 




682 




. i 1,659 


1,607 


1, 611' ' 




1,620 




: 490 
. : 886 


529 
■ 455 
940 


384" 
404 
1,021 




'385 
' 426 
941 




'• 35,462 


38,053 


36,429 


36,670 



a/ Winter area remaining for harvest. b/ Spring acreage as indicated by 
farmers' intentions to plant. c/ Winter sowings up to Jan. 1. d/ Without 
the Saar. e_/ -Winter acreage less percentage winter-killed.' ' ff April 
estimate . : .. , ' ' 



May 17, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



273 



WHEAT, INCLUDING FLOUR: Shipments from principal exporting countries 
as given "by current trade so ur ces , 19 34 -35 to 1936- 37 



; Total Shipments 1937 Shipments 

Country | shi pments j week ended : July 1 - May 7 

; 1934-55 , 1935-36 . : A pr . 24 , May 1 ■ May 7 :i935-56 : 1956-37 

:. 1,000 ; i.ooo ; 1,000 j 1,000 : 1,000 : 1,000 j. 1,000 

; : "bushels : "bushels ; bushels : bu shels; bushels j "bushel s j "bushels 

North America a/ : 162, 852 : 219 , 688 : 2,008: 2,915; 2, 417 1 174, 464: 194, 556 

Canada, j .; j . ■ I j • '.' . 

4 markets b/ j 176, 059 j 246 ,-199 ; 4,541: 5,576: 1,905:201,695:175,667 

United States c/ '• 31. 532 : 15-950 ] 241: 278: ;277: 6,540j' 7,922 

Argentina 1 18 6, 228 j 77,384; 5,992; 2,577: 1, 689: 70,576:152,232 

Australia : 111 , 628 i 110, 060 i 2,624: 1,113; 2,235; 98,748;. 82,998 

U.S.S.R ' : 1,672: 30,224' oj 0; 0; 28,616: 88 

Danube '• ■ « ; | I ; 

and Bulgaria d/ I 4,104: 8,216! 1,184'; 2,368: 2,640; 8,168; 56,360 

British India ! c/2,318; &/a,5S9» 72; 104 ; 8; 25 6 : 8,952 

Total e/ ' 468, 782:448, IQi: ' J ! \ 380 , 828 j 494 , 966' 

Total European ; ! : '< ; If / i f / 

shipments a/ ! 387,752; 355,033! 11,096; | j 290, 008; 595,080 

Total ex-European j j ] ■ • jf / \ f / 

shipments a/ : 147, 938 j 135, 52 8 j 2 ; 112 : : : 107, 248 j 107, 512 



Compiled from official and trade sources. a/ Broomhall 1 s Corn Trade News. 
|7 Fort William, Port Arthur, Vancouver, prince Rupert, and New Westminster. 
c/ Official, d/ Black Sea shipments only. e/ Total of trade figures includes 
North America as reported by Broomhall. f/ To April 24. 



CANADA: Acreages of specif ied. crops , 1955-1957 



Crop 


1955 


.1956 


1957 a/ 


Percentage 
1957 is 
of 1956 




Acres 


Acres. 


Acres 


percent 


Oats 


14,096,200 


15,118,400 


12,959,900 


99 


Barley 


3,886,800 


4,452,500 


4,450,300 


100 


Flaxseed 


214,400 


467,750 


427,250 


91 


Mixed grains 


1,152,500 


1,172,800 


1,162,700' 


99 


Potatoes 


; 506,800 


496,400 


501 , 000 


101 



Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa, 
a/ Intended acreage. 



274 



iroreign Crot>s and Markets 



Vol. 34, No. 20 



WHEAT: Closing Saturday prices of July futures 



Date ■ 


: Chicago : 


Kansas 


City: 


Minneapolis: 


Winnipeg a/: 


Liverpool aj 


, Bu.enos 
Aires b/ 




- ; v 1936 * 1937 ; 


; 1936' 


1937 


" 1936 


,1937 


; 1.936 


1937 


1936 


1937 : 


1936*1937 




' : "Cents; Cents 


Cents: 


C en t s 


: Cents 


; Cents 


: Cents 


Cents 


. Cents 


Cents* 


Cents: Cents 


High cj-i-. 
Low cj . . . 


..: ' 94 : -130 
i.:«:..^4-: ; :li5; 


93 : 
:" 81 : 


125 
112 


: 104 
: 91 


142 
: 125 


84 ; 
: 77 


145 
124 


: 94 
: 89 


154 
: 131 


91 : 126 
: 90 : 113 


Apr . 17 . . 
'24. . 


.:: 94 : 120 
. : 9--1 : 118 : 


93 : 

90 •: 
83": 
r 83 : 

• 
• 


115 

-114 
' 116 
113 


104 

:" 99 : 

96 
: 93 


131 

128 
130 
: 126 


84 : 
: 82 
: 79 : 

: 78 : 


130 

129 : 
131 
:' 128 . 


: 93 j 

; 94 
.-. 91 

:• . -89 • 


. 132 : 

. 138 ; 
. 137 ; 
: 137 


91 : 114 

90 : 121 
90 : 120 

' 90 : 122' 



a/ Conversions at noon "buying rat 
other price's. • cj Apr.' 1 to date. 



.WHEAT:: . Weekly weighted average cash price at stated markets 





: Al 1 . classes, 


¥o. 2- : 


"-■ -Ho 


, 1 : 


Ho. 2 Hard: 


Ho. 2 : 


Western 


Week. ". 
ended" ,' 


an d.g: 
-.{•six m? 


^ades : 
irkets: 


Hard Winter: 
•Kansas City: 


3k. H. Soring: 
Minneapolis: 


Araher Durun: 
Minneapolis': 


Red Winter 
St. Louis 


' /White 
Seattle a/ 


™ 1936; 


1937 : 


4 1936 ; 1937 : 


1936 


1937 : 


1936 


1937 : 


1936 


: 1937. 


1936 ;1937 




: Cents 


Cents 


:C ent s: Cent s 


: Cents 


Cent s 


: Cents 


: Cents 


: Cents 


Cents 


Cents: Cents 


High h/ . . 


. : 98 : 


146 


: 106 : 144 


: 127 


170 


: 110 


: 199 


110 


: 147 


, 87 : 122 






132 '- ; 


: 96 : 1^54 


: 116 


: 142 


: " 103 


125 ' 


• 102 ' 


: 136 • 


82 : 117 


Apr. 17. . 


V 94 : 


138 


104 : 136 • 


124 : 


155 


. 103 : 


161 •: 


107 : 


142 : 


85 : 120 


•■24.... 


$ 98 : 


137 


106 : 137 


127 : 


159 


: 110 • 


152 ' 


110 • 




'• '87 : 119 


May 1. 


93 : 


132 


. 101 : . 134 


121 : 


150 


109 . 


125 : 


106 .: 


136 : 


84 : 117 




. : ' 92 


133 


: 96 : 136 


: 118- 


142 


: 103 


: - 128 - 


: 102 


: 136 


. 82 : 



a/ Weekly average of daily cash quotations, "basi s Ho.- 1 sacked* 
h/ Apr. 1 to date. 



May 17, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



275 



FEED GRAINS AND RYE: Weekly average price per "bushel of corn, rye, 
oa.ts, and barley at leading markets a/ 









Corn 






Rye 


Oats 


Bar! 


■ey 




I Chicago 


— — 1 ■ 1 

Buenos Aires Minneapolis 


Chicago 


Minneapoli s 


Week 


: No. 3 
Yellow 


Futures 


Futures 


f 

No 




No. 3 

White 


No. 


2 


« 


:l'9-3'6 


•1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 :1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 


1337 




Cent s 


Cent s 


Cent s 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cent s 


Cent s 


Cent s 


Cent s 


Cents 


Cents 


High b/. . . 


65 


138 


64 


133 


43 : 


58 


58 


117 


31 


55 


74 


137 


Low . . . 


59 


108 


• 59 


• 105 


39 ' 


: 48 


48 


106 


26 


49 


58 


112 


Apr/ 10. ..- 


•60 


138 


May ' 
60 


May 
130 


June 

42 ■ 


• May 
58 


. 49 


117 


27 


54 


66 


113 


17... 


62" 


135 


61 


126 


42 : 


54 


51' 


112 


28 


54 


71 


120 


•24.. : 


65 


136 


64 * 


128 


42 


• 54 


50 • 


108 


29 


. 55 


62 


118 


May 1 . . . . 


63 


136 


63 


129 


42 


53 


48 


108 


27 


54 


64 


126 


8 


64 


138 


61 


133 


42 • 


55 


49 . 


110 


28 


. .53. 


61 


122 



a/ Cash prices are weighted averages of reported sales; future prices are simple 



averages of daily quotations, b/ For period January 1 to latest. date shown. 



FEED GRAINS: Movement from principal exporting, countries 



Commodity 
and 
country 


Exports 
f or year 


; Shipments 1937, 
week ended a/ 


Exports as far 
i as reported 


1934-35 


1935-36 


: Apr. 24 


May 1 


May 8 


; July 1 
to 


1935-36 

: W 


1936-37 
V 




1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 




1,000 


1 , 000 


BARLEY, EXPORTS :c 


/bushels 


bushels 


bushels 


bushels 


bushels 




bushels 


bushels 


United States. . . 


4,050 


■ 9,886 


114 


0 


0 


May 8 


8,582 


5,118 




14,453 
20,739 
11,250 


6,882 
9,468 
37,375 








Apr. 30 

May 8 
May -8 


4,677 
7,856 
40,718 


16,541 

13,875 
24,327 




257 
39 6 


78 
239 


128 
182 


Danube & U. S. S.E, 




50 , 492 


63, 611 










61,833 


59,861 


OATS, EXPORTS: c/ 


























United States. . . 


1,147 


1,429 


0 


0 


2 


May 8 


517 


681 




17,407 
43,753 
8 , 444 


14,892 
9,790 
2,847 








Apr. 30 

May 8 
May 8 


12, 355 
9,538 
1,390 


8,822 
21,181 
810 




441 

0 


69 


731 

0 


Danube & U.S.S.R 


0 




70,751 


28,958 










24,200 


31,494 


CORN, EXPORTS: d/ 




















Nov. 1 to 






United States. . . 


880 


885 


0 


1 


0 


May 8 


277 


191 


Danube & U.S.S.R. 


14,939 


14,984 


978 


833 


1,607 


May 8 


6,062 


16,930 




256, 143 
21,882 


307,638 
8,910 


8,842 
51 


8,744 
51 


5,607 
26 


May 8 
May 8 


143,795 
6,326 


204,140 
2,847 






293,844 


332,417' 










156,460 


224,108 


United States 




















41,141 


24,521 








Mar. 31 


7,381! 


34 , 214 



Compiled from official and trade sources. a/ The weeks shown in these columns are 
nearest to the date shown, b/ Preliminary. c/ Year beginning July 1. d/ Year 
beginning November 1. 



276 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, No. 20 



Page 

Late cables 263 



Barley, acreage, Canada, 

1935-1937 273 

Cotton: 

Exports, China, October-March, 

1936-37 263 

Imports, China, October-March, 

1936-37 263 

International trade, 

August-March,, 1936-37 266 

Flaxseed, acreage, Canada, 

1935-1937 273 

Fruit, crop prospects, Europe, 

1937 ~ 265 

Grains : 

Acreage, Canada, 1937 264,273 

Condition, Europe, May 1, 1937... 264 
Movement (feed), Principal 

countries, May 8, 1937.. 275 

prices (feed), 'orincieal 

markets, May 8, 1937 275 

Lard: 

Exports, U. S., March 1937 271 

Imports, U. K. , March 1937 271 



Lard, cont'd!: Page 
Prices, specified markets, 

March 1937 270 

Oats, acreage, Canada, 1935-1937.. 273 
pork: 

Exports, U. S., March 1937 271 

Import quotes, U. K. , July- 



September, 1936-37 265,270 

Imports, U. K. , March 1937 ...... . 271 

Prices, U. K. , March 1937 270 

Supplies, U. K . , March 1937 ....... 271 

potatoes, s.creago, Canada, 

1935-1937 273 

Rye: 

Acreage, specified countries, 

1934-1937 272 

prices, U. S., May 3, 1937 275 

Wheat : 
Acreage: 



Canada (spring), .1935,1937... 

Specified countries (winter), 



1934-1937 272 

Imports, Jarjan, July-March, 

1936-37... 263 

Prices, specified markets, 

May 3, 1937 274 

Shipments, orincipal 'countries, 

May 7, 1937 273 



V